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Research at Stanford

Cancer Clinical Trials Office

A Multicenter, Stratified, Open, Randomized, Comparator-Controlled, Parallel-Group Phase III Study Comparing Treatment with Lu-177-DOTA0-Tyr3-Octreotate with Octreotide LAR in Patients with Inoperable, Progressive, Somatostatin Receptor Positive, Midgut Carcinoid Tumors

Stanford Co-Investigators: Erik S. Mittra, M.D., Ph.D. & Pamela Kunz, M.D.
Sponsor: Advanced Accelerator Applications

Role: Clinical Research Coordinator (Sep. 2016 – Aug. 2017)

Until this clinical trial, patients diagnosed with neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) had few options for treatment. Traditional chemotherapy was not well-suited to attack this aggressive type of cancer. Often the course of action was to minimize the symptoms as much as possible, but little could be done to stop the progression of the disease. This study was a phase-III clinical trial that investigated the therapeutic benefit of the drug, Lutathera, for the treatment of neuroendocrine tumors. This drug later became FDA-approved for the treatment of NETs.

PET/MRI of Cerebral Blood Flow with Oxygen-15

Principal Investigators: Greg Zaharchuk, M.D., Ph.D. & Audrey Fan, Ph.D.

Role: Clinical Research Coordinator (Aug. 2016 – Aug. 2017)

Cerebrovascular disease is difficult to diagnose. The gold-standard for diagnosis is through a Positron Emission Tomography (PET) perfusion study using the radioactive tracer, Oxygen-15 (O-15). However, due to the cost of the infrastructure required to produce and image O-15, its use is limited to elite research institutions. The development of a more-widely accessible diagnostic technique is required. This research worked on the development of the use of the Arterial-Spin Labeling (ASL) technique for the diagnosis of Moyamoya Disease using MRI.

A Phase-IV Post-Approval Clinical Study of ExAblate Treatment of Metastatic Bone Tumors for the Palliation of Pain

Stanford Co-Investigator: Pejman Ghanouni, M.D.
Sponsor: Insightec

Role: Clinical Research Coordinator (May 2016 – Aug. 2017)

Patients diagnosed with certain types of cancer may have their disease metastasize to other parts of the body, including the bones. Metastatic disease of the bones can be particularly painful. While there may be little that can be done to stop the progression of the cancer at this stage, every patient can benefit from the palliation of the pain associated with the bony lesions. This study use high-intensity ultrasound to ablate the nerves around the bone tumors to relieve pain.

Ga-68-PSMA PET/MRI for Detection of Regional Nodal and Distant Metastases in Patients with Intermediate and High-Risk Prostate Cancer

Principal Investigator: Andrei Iagaru, M.D.

Role: Clinical Research Coordinator (Apr. 2016 – Aug. 2017)

Prostate cancer is one of the most common treatable cancers, but it must be caught before it has metastasized. Therefore, patients must be evaluated for metastatic disease before being considered for surgery to remove the prostate. The Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen (PSMA) labelled with Gallium-68 was investigated in this study for the detection of metastatic prostate cancer in newly-diagnosed patients.

Ga-68-PSMA PET/CT for Detection of Recurrent Prostate Cancer After Initial Therapy in Patients with Elevated PSA and Non-Contributory Bone Scintigraphy, Computed Tomography (CT) or Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)

Principal Investigator: Andrei Iagaru, M.D.

Role: Clinical Research Coordinator (Apr. 2016 – Aug. 2017)

This clinical trial evaluated the efficacy of PSMA for the detection of metastatic prostate cancer.

An Open-Label Study of the Efficacy of F-18-FSPG PET/CT in Subjects with Intracranial Cancers

Principal Investigator: Erik S. Mittra, M.D., Ph.D.
Sponsor: Piramal

Role: Clinical Research Coordinator (Mar. 2016 – Aug. 2017)

This clinical trial evaluated the efficacy of FSPG for the detection of intracranial cancers.

An Exploratory Study of the Role of F-18-FSPG PET/CT Imaging for Cancer Patients Receiving Therapy

Principal Investigator: Erik S. Mittra, M.D., Ph.D.

Role: Clinical Research Coordinator (Mar. 2016 – Aug. 2017)

This study examined the use of the radioactive tracer FSPG for the detection of cancer.